Court frees businessman jailed for fighting buglar

A millionaire businessman jailed for attacking a career criminal who kidnapped his family and held them at knife-point has walked free from prison today.

Munir Hussain’s 30-month sentence was reduced to a ‘merciful’ term of two years suspended by the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge, and two other judges at the Court of Appeal in London.

Munir was met by his son Awais as he was released from Bullingdon Prison in Oxfordshire.

Lord Judge said the ‘plain, simple reality’ was that Munir was a peaceful man who was acting as a response to the ‘dreadful and terrifying ordeal’ while fearing for the lives of his wife and daughter.

Munir’s brother Tokeer Hussain, 35, had his 39-month jail term reduced to two years.

The brothers, described as family men at the heart of the local community, were sentenced after being found guilty of causing grievous bodily harm with intent.

The decision to free Munir was made by Lord Judge, Mrs Justice Swift and Mr Justice Sweeney. Lord Judge said the case was one of  ‘true exceptionality’.

A sentence of two years was in itself “merciful”, but he added: “We have come to the conclusion that we have ample justification for ordering that it should be suspended.”

Hussain, his wife and children returned from their mosque during Ramadan to find intruders wearing balaclavas in their home.

They feared for their lives as their hands were tied behind their backs and they were forced to crawl from room to room.

Hussain escaped and with his brother Tokeer chased the offenders down the street in High Wycombe, bringing one of them Walid Salem to the ground.

Salem was left with a permanent brain injury after he was hit so hard with a cricket bat it broke into three pieces.

He was attacked on the ground when “completely defenceless” and his injuries included a fractured skull, a fractured jaw and ribs.

Hussain’s retaliation was described at his original trial at Reading Crown Court as a self-defence which went too far.

Salem was the only intruder caught after the incident on September 3, 2008, but his injuries meant he was unfit to plea after being charged with false imprisonment.

Whilst it is good news that he is to be freed it is a disgrace that he was even convicted. It is all very well for the “courts” to say that he and his brother took things too far but “they” weren’t there. Munir and his family were subjected to a horrendous ordeal in their own home and who knows what could have happened if he hadn’t escaped and sought the help of his brother?

Good on Lord Judge for seeing sense but what an awful thing that this man was ever charged.